MONDAY FROM THE INTERIOR: MAILBOX MONDAY & WHAT ARE YOU READING? — NOV. 14

LET'S TALK BOOKS!

 

 

Welcome to another Monday From the Interior, spotlighting Mailbox Monday and What Are You Reading?

Mailbox Monday will be hosted through November by The Mailbox Monday blog; and What Are You Reading? is hosted by Sheila, at Book Journey.

 

 

MAILBOX MONDAY:

 

 

This week, I received one review book, three books I purchased, and one download for Sparky, my Kindle.

Here’s what I got:

1.  One Voice Too Many, by Paul Martin Midden (from the publisher)

Do we really know each other? Jeremy Walker seemed like a decent human being: hardworking, independent, intelligent. But he has a past that he can not quite shake and a terrible secret that only he knew. Despite a history of rocky relationships, he was determined to make a success of his relationship with Macy, an attractive woman who was similarly smart and independent. Will he succeed? The obstacles loom large.

2.  Dirty Secret, by Jessie Sholl

To be the child of a compulsive hoarder is to live in a permanent state of unease. Because if my mother is one of those crazy junk-house people, then what does that make me?When her divorced mother was diagnosed with cancer, New York City writer Jessie Sholl returned to her hometown of Minneapolis to help her prepare for her upcoming surgery and get her affairs in order. While a daunting task for any adult dealing with an aging parent, it’s compounded for Sholl by one lifelong, complex, and confounding truth: her mother is a compulsive hoarder. Dirty Secret is a daughter’s powerful memoir of confronting her mother’s disorder, of searching for the normalcy that was never hers as a child, and, finally, cleaning out the clutter of her mother’s home in the hopes of salvaging the true heart of their relationship—before it’s too late.

Growing up, young Jessie knew her mother wasn’t like other mothers: chronically disorganized, she might forgo picking Jessie up from kindergarten to spend the afternoon thrift store shopping. Now, tracing the downward spiral in her mother’s hoarding behavior to the death of a long-time boyfriend, she bravely wades into a pathological sea of stuff: broken appliances, moldy cowboy boots, twenty identical pairs of graying bargain-bin sneakers, abandoned arts and crafts, newspapers, magazines, a dresser drawer crammed with discarded eyeglasses, shovelfuls of junk mail . . . the things that become a hoarder’s “treasures.” With candor, wit, and not a drop of sentimentality, Jessie Sholl explores the many personal and psychological ramifications of hoarding while telling an unforgettable mother-daughter tale.

3.  The Corn Maiden, by Joyce Carol Oates

An incomparable master storyteller in all forms, in The Corn Maiden and Other Nightmares Joyce Carol Oates spins six imaginative tales of suspense. “The Corn Maiden” is the gut-wrenching story of Marissa, a beautiful and sweet eleven-year-old girl with hair the color of corn silk. Taken by an older girl from her school who has told two friends in her thrall of the Indian legend of the Corn Maiden, in which a girl is sacrificed to ensure a good crop, Marissa is kept in a secluded basement and convinced that the world has ended. Marissa’s seemingly inevitable fate becomes ever more terrifying as the older girl relishes her power, giving the tale unbearable tension with a shocking conclusion. In “Helping Hands,” published here for the first time, a lonely woman meets a man in the unlikely clutter of a dingy charity shop and extends friendship. She has no idea what kinds of doors she may be opening. The powerful stories in this extraordinary collection further enhance Joyce Carol Oates’s standing as one of the world’s greatest writers of suspense.

4.  11/22/63 – Stephen King

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? Stephen King’s heart-stoppingly dramatic new novel is about a man who travels back in time to prevent the JFK assassination—a thousand page tour de force.

Following his massively successful novel Under the Dome, King sweeps readers back in time to another moment—a real life moment—when everything went wrong: the JFK assassination. And he introduces readers to a character who has the power to change the course of history.
Jake Epping is a thirty-five-year-old high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program. He receives an essay from one of the students—a gruesome, harrowing first person story about the night 50 years ago when Harry Dunning’s father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a hammer. Harry escaped with a smashed leg, as evidenced by his crooked walk.

Not much later, Jake’s friend Al, who runs the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to 1958. He enlists Jake on an insane—and insanely possible—mission to try to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake’s new life as George Amberson and his new world of Elvis and JFK, of big American cars and sock hops, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jake’s life—a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time.

A tribute to a simpler era and a devastating exercise in escalating suspense, 11/22/63 is Stephen King at his epic best.

5.  Mudbound (e-book), by Hillary Jordan

Jordan’s beautiful debut (winner of the 2006 Bellwether Prize for literature of social responsibility) carries echoes of As I Lay Dying, complete with shifts in narrative voice, a body needing burial, flood and more. In 1946, Laura McAllan, a college-educated Memphis schoolteacher, becomes a reluctant farmer’s wife when her husband, Henry, buys a farm on the Mississippi Delta, a farm she aptly nicknames Mudbound. Laura has difficulty adjusting to life without electricity, indoor plumbing, readily accessible medical care for her two children and, worst of all, life with her live-in misogynous, racist, father-in-law. Her days become easier after Florence, the wife of Hap Jackson, one of their black tenants, becomes more important to Laura as companion than as hired help. Catastrophe is inevitable when two young WWII veterans, Henry’s brother, Jamie, and the Jacksons’ son, Ronsel, arrive, both battling nightmares from horrors they’ve seen, and both unable to bow to Mississippi rules after eye-opening years in Europe. Jordan convincingly inhabits each of her narrators, though some descriptive passages can be overly florid, and the denouement is a bit maudlin. But these are minor blemishes on a superbly rendered depiction of the fury and terror wrought by racism. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

***

 

WHAT ARE YOU READING?

 

 

And now for a look back at last week.  On the face of things, it seems like I did more blogging than anything else.

Here’s What Happened:

MONDAY POTPOURRI – PAPER BLIZZARD

COZY READING CHALLENGE 2012

THE MORNING AFTER – EXCERPT

HUMP DAY POTPOURRI

MIMOSA TIME: READING/WRITING COMPANION

CHOCOLATE:  A “HEALTHY” GUILTY PLEASURE

THE PROTECTIVE LIMBS – A TREE’S STORY

SATURDAY POTPOURRI-READING

Review:  The Accidental Activist, by Alon Shalev (On blog tour, so review will be posted on 11/28/11) – 5/5 stars!

Review:    Inseparable, by Dora Heldt (click title for review)

Review:   When She Woke (e-book), by Hillary Jordan (click title for review)

 

What’s Up Next?

1.   The Strangers on Montagu Street, by Karen White

2.  The Sisters, by Nancy Jensen

3.  Armed, by Elaine Macko

4.  You Are My Only (e-book), by Beth Kephart

 

***

That’s it for this week.  Hope to enjoy this one as much as I did last week.  Come on by and share your own reading weeks!

71 thoughts on “MONDAY FROM THE INTERIOR: MAILBOX MONDAY & WHAT ARE YOU READING? — NOV. 14

  1. I wish I lived next door so I could borrow a few of those fab books when you were done. Corn Maiden is about the only one I didn’t just add (or already had) my TBR list.

    Enjoy the reading!
    Shelleyrae @ Book’d Out

    Like

  2. The Corn Maiden sounds awesome, it’s already on my wishlist and I’m looking forward to your thoughts on The Sisters. Hope you enjoy You Are My Only; I did.
    Have a wonderful week and happy reading 🙂

    Like

  3. I think Dirty Secret would be a great moviator to purge some of my excess clutter in my spare bedroom. The show Hoarders always does that for me. Hope you enjoy it!

    Like

    • Oh, I think it will be for me, too, Kim. I have lots of stuff, and while I tell myself (and others, like my daughter!) that it’s nice, decorative stuff, I do have to clear out now and then. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

Please leave your thoughts. Comments, not awards, feed my soul. Thanks!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s